Know Your No-Zones: Sharing Ontario’s Highways with Tractor-Trailers

Know Your No-Zones: Sharing Ontario’s Highways with Tractor-Trailers

Have you ever found yourself on the highway, frustrated about that massive tractor-trailer in front of you, so you start cruising up beside it, aiming to pass? If that’s you, it’s imperative that you know about the large trucks’ “No-Zones”. 

Transport truck accidents have been on the rise in Ontario in recent years. By mid-2019, commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) had been linked to 30% of fatal crashes on the province’s highways. 

There are a number of reasons that can contribute to an accident on the part of the truck and its driver:

  • Inattentiveness (distracted driving)
  • Driver fatigue 
  • Following too closely
  • Poor vehicle maintenance

But there is something you can do, as the driver of a regular-sized motor vehicle, to protect yourself: Know the No-Zones. 

Never Hang Out in the No-Zone

There are four areas on large commercial motor vehicles that are classified as No-Zones, as diagrammed here by  https://www.cmvroadsharing.org/:

One-third of fatal crashes between cars and trucks occur with the car travelling in one of these No-Zones.

Everyone’s aware of the blind spots in their car — it’s why we’re taught to look over our shoulders before changing lanes instead of solely relying on the rear-view mirrors — but these blind spot areas are expanded greatly for the driver of a CMV.

In fact, in all four of the No-Zones — to the right, to the left, directly behind and even directly in front of the truck, your regular-sized automobile “disappears” for the truck driver. 

On the right side of the truck, the two lanes to the right are in the No-Zone, as the driver has great difficulty seeing that area.

Directly in front of or behind the truck are No-Zones, not only because of their difficulty in seeing cars in those areas, but also because a truck of that size can take over 66% longer to stop in a braking situation. 

If you must pass a CMV, you should do it on the left side, where the blind spot isn’t as large, but it should still be done quickly and assuredly, so you can return to the truck driver’s view as soon as possible. 

Unfortunately, the trucking No-Zone is not something that the typical driver’s education class teaches, so the lesson is often learned too late.

If you have lost a loved one or suffered tragically from a transport truck accident, you need to contact a personal injury lawyer with extensive experience in this area: Brian A. Horowitz has successfully handled cases like these for almost 35 years. Call Horowitz Injury Law now at 416-925-4100 for a free consultation, to ensure you get the compensation you deserve. 

 

By |2020-02-15T23:21:07+00:00February 15th, 2020|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Know Your No-Zones: Sharing Ontario’s Highways with Tractor-Trailers